PDS Resources

Going to Scale with PDSs

‘Going to scale’ is defined as creating sufficient numbers of PDSs to prepare all teacher candidates placed in a district, and to support the needs of new teachers in that district. The strategy is targeted at providing professional clinical preparation and induction for new teachers in order to increase teacher quality and raise retention rates, particularly in low-performing schools. With the support of the Arthur Vining Davis Foundation, NCATE worked with three PDS partnerships in urban areas to explore this concept and develop models for how it might be achieved.

Denver, Jacksonville, and Waco PDSs Develop a Plan to ‘Scale Up'. Strategy to Improve Teacher Quality and Increase Achievement of At-Risk Students in Hard-to-Staff Urban Schools by Marsha Levine.

Levine Marsha (Spring 2004 )"Going to Scale with Professional Development Schools" (Adobe PDF) Quality Teaching , Washington, DC.: NCATE

Wise Arthur and Marsha Levine (February 27, 2002) "The 10-Step Solution Helping Urban Districts Boost Achievement In Low-Performing Schools in Urban Districts". Education Week

PDS Networks and Websites

A number of organizations, networks, and clearinghouses provide information about PDS partnerships. They include:

Professional Development Schools: Selected Publications

Byrd, D. and J. McIntyre (Eds.). (1999). Research on Professional Development Schools. Teacher Education Yearbook VII, Assn. of Teacher Educators. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Clark, Richard W. (1999). Effective Professional Development Schools. San Francisco: Jossey Bass

Darling-Hammond, Linda (Ed.). 1994. Professional Development Schools: Schools for Developing a Profession. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Fishchetti, J. Hovda, R., Kyle, D.W., and Stroble, B. (Eds.). (1999). Professional Development Schools: Historical Context, Changing Practices, and Emerging Issues, Parts I & II, Peabody Journal of Education, 74(3 & 4). New Jersey and London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Goodlad, John. (1990). Teachers for our nation’s schools. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass.

Holmes Group. (1990). Tomorrow’s schools: Principles for the Design of PDSs. A report of the Holmes Group. East Lansing, MI: Author.

Levine, Marsha (Ed.). (1992). Professional Practice Schools: Linking Teacher Education and School Reform. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Ishler, Richard E. (ed.). 2008. Professional Development Schools: Enhancing Teacher Quality.
A resource/textbook for universities and for P-12 schools considering PDS partnerships. The book is organized around the NCATE Standards for PDSs. It is the result of four years of work initiated by the Pennsylvania Academy for the Profession of Teaching and Learning. To order, call 215-568-6150 x 280 or email: books@rbs.org.

Levine, Marsha, and Roberta Trachtman (Eds.). (1997). Making Professional Development Schools Work: Politics, Practice and Policy. New York: Teachers College Press.

Levine, Marsha. (2002 March). “Why Invest in Professional Development Schools?” Educational Leadership.

Levine, Marsha and Eleanor Churins (1999). “Designing Standards That Empower Professional Development Schools,” Peabody Journal of Education, 74 (3 & 4).

Levine, Marsha. (Fall1998). “Professional Development Schools: More Than a Good Idea,” Teaching and Change.

Levine, Marsha. (1998). “Can Professional Development Schools Help Us Achieve What Matters Most?” Action in Teacher Education, 19(2), 63-73.

Levine Marsha and Trachtman Roberta(Eds.). (2005). Implementing PDS Standards: Stories From the Field, NCATE: Washington, DC.

Murrell, Peter. ((1998). Like Stone Soup: The Role of the Professional Development School in the Renewal of Urban Schools. Washington DC: AACTE.

Neapolitan, Jane and T, R. Berkeley (Eds.) 2006. Where do we go from here? Issues in the sustainability of professional development schools. Peter Lang Publishing Inc.: New York.

Neapolitan, Jane and T, R. Berkeley (Eds.) 2005. Staying the course with professional development schools. Peter Lang Publishing Inc.: New York.

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. (2001). Standards for Professional Development Schools, NCATE: Washington, DC.

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. (2001). Handbook for the Assessment of Professional Development Schools, NCATE: Washington, DC.

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education publications: Levine, Marsha (Ed.). (1998). Designing Standards that Work for Professional Development Schools. Washington DC: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Osguthorpe, Russell T., Carl R. Harris, Melanie Harris, and Sharon Black. (eds.)1995. Partner Schools: Centers for Educational Renewal. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Petrie, Hugh G. ed. 1995. Professionalization, Partnership, and Power: Building Professional Development Schools. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Teitel, Lee. (1997). "Changing Teacher Education Through Professional Development School Partnerships: A Five Year Follow-up Study" Teachers College Record, 99(2) 311-334.

Teitel, Lee. (1998). Governance: Designing Professional Development School Governance Structures. Washington DC: AACTE.

Teitel, Lee with Ismat Abdal-Haqq. ((2000). Assessing the Impacts of Professional Development Schools. Washington DC: AACTE.

Teitel, Lee. (January/February, (2001). “An Assessment Framework for Professional Development Schools: Going Beyond the Leap of Faith” in Journal of Teacher Education. 52 (1) 57-69.

Teitel, Lee. (2003). The Professional Development Schools Handbook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Teitel, Lee. (2004). How Professional Development Schools Make a Difference: A Review of Research. National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education: Washington, DC.

Tunks, Jeanne and J. Neapolitan. (2007). A Framework for Research on Professional Development Schools. University Press of America.

Provides a developmental approach for research on professional development schools. The authors have developed a framework to guide researchers designing research methods that are effective and appropriate to the different developmental stages of individual professional development schools. These developmental stages are outlined in the Standards for Professional Development Schools, published by NCATE.


 Print